The StigmaBeat Project is Live!

We are very proud to announce that three films, all co-created with young people from Gippsland, are available for anyone to watch online!

We started with something all the participants have in common: experiences of parental mental health. Yet, these films share the participants’ insights and perspectives on the various kinds of stigma they experience day-to-day.

As project lead, Dr. Rochelle Hine from Monash Rural Health explains,

“We found that mental health stigma interacts with and exacerbates other forms of stigma and discrimination, such as sexism, racism and homophobia. We were curious to find out how these findings might resonate for a cohort of rural young people.”

Dr. Rochelle Hine

What are the films? 

An introduction to StigmaBeat: Provides an overview of the project, including insights directly from young people about the experience of StigmaBeat.

Photo stories: Where StigmaBeat participants share photos they have taken of something or someplace that represents being free of judgement and stigma.  

Stigma Stevie: An animation about a young person’s experiences of stigma and a stigma-fighting superhero that needs a hand. The story and characters were developed from StigmaBeat participants’ ideas and tested with them in the creation process. 

Stigma Stevie: An animation about a young person’s experiences of stigma and a stigma-fighting superhero that needs a hand. The story and characters were developed from StigmaBeat participants’ ideas and tested with them in the creation process. 

Photo stories: Where StigmaBeat participants share photos they have taken of something or someplace that represents being free of judgement and stigma.  

Photo stories: Where StigmaBeat participants share photos they have taken of something or someplace that represents being free of judgement and stigma.  

Can I use the films in my classroom? 

How did the films come about?

In 2022, 18 young people aged 15-25 years from Gippsland participated in two workshops at Latrobe Youth Space in Morwell, co-facilitated by peer leaders from Satellite Foundation. These peer leaders also have lived experience of parental mental health challenges. The highly interactive workshops featured dialogue, storytelling, art, filming, and photography and were designed to create a safe and inclusive space for deep and brave conversations.

From these conversations, Satellite, the research group and creative producer Hannah Moon developed these films. The young people were also involved in this creative process – from being on screen to providing feedback on initial takes to being voice actors!

For more context on the project see this article about introducing the project, and this article about the grant that made this project happen.

Who helped to make StigmaBeat happen?

StigmaBeat was funded by an FRRR ABC Heywire Youth Innovation Grant and the Latrobe Health Assembly. StigmaBeat was made possible through a partnership between Monash University, Australian Catholic University, researchers from Canada, the UK, and Sweden and Satellite Foundation.

The project’s success was also due to the strong contribution of young people throughout – including multiple consultations with Satellite’s Squad, participating as members of the research team and of course, the participants who generously spent time at StigmaBeat workshop and in sharing their feedback.