Satellite Celebrates World Photography Day

World Photography Day

Every year on 19 August, the world marks World Photography Day. Founded in 2009, the main aim of World Photography Day is to connect individuals to inspire and create using the medium of photography. It is a celebration of “the art, craft, science and history of photography.” Here at Satellite Foundation, we value photography as a means of creative expression. …

July Newsletter

Dear Satellite supporters and friends, This July newsletter is coming to you almost mid-August! That’s how busy we have been, combined with team members off sick, and a flurry of programs, events and more. We promise to bring you our August newsletter on time at the end of this calendar month 😊 Speaking of calendars, make sure to check the …

National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children's Day

Happy National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day! This year’s theme is ‘My Dreaming, My Future’. Initiated by SNAICC – National Voice for Our Children, and run annually since 1988, the 4th of August every year marks this day dedicated to celebrating and honouring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Commemorating the day comes with an acknowledgment of the …

Autobiographical Art

Autobiographical Art

Join Satellite Foundation this August at Brunswick Town Hall for a night of artsy chats and insights into a writer’s process. Autobiographical Art features celebrated authors Maxine Beneba Clarke, Justin Heazlewood and Sian Prior, who will discuss the process of writing a memoir, the many ways we can put ourselves into our art and the way our lived experience and …

June Newsletter

Dear Satellite supporters and friends, The winter chill has set in, and we hope you are all keeping as warm as possible – lots of tea and hot water bottles always help 😊. The events of the last week in the US have touched us deeply. Having the opportunity, support, and care to plan for parenthood is such an important …

The Satellite Slam a Roaring Success!

Satellite Slam

On 15 June Satellite celebrated the first-ever Satellite Slam, a true celebration of our voice, our work, and our people. The Satellite Slam showcased the coming together of the core elements that make up Satellite Foundation and the unique aspects of Satellite’s programs including peer connection, creativity, and the sharing of thoughts and experiences. There were four interactive exhibition spaces …

The Next Chapter of ‘It’s A Mad World’ is Coming!

Do you feel there are gaps in the dialogues around mental health experiences? Do you like the idea of exploring these conversations through things like art, performance, film, or photography? Then apply for the next chapter of It’s a Mad World, now! It’s A Mad World is a showcase of different perspectives on mental health, created by those with lived …

Music for Better Mental Health

Music and all forms of creativity can have a real impact on young people's mental health

“Where words fail, music speaks,” said the world-renowned Danish author, Hans Christian Anderson. This is especially true when exploring the intersection between music as a form of therapy and mental health. According to the Australian Music Therapy Association, music therapy is a research-based allied health profession that can support people of any age who might be experiencing mental, intellectual, physical, …

An interview with Henry von Doussa: The Pink Book

The Pink Book by Henry von Doussa

Henry von Doussa is Satellite’s Family and Community Engagement Person, a social researcher at The Bouverie Centre, and a published author. The Pink Book is Henry’s second book, a beautiful collection of images and essays, collages and memoirs that speak to sexuality, gender, grief, and loss, and growing up as a gay man in Australia. Designed by award-winning book designer …

May Newsletter

Dear Satellite supporters and friends, Today we join hands and hearts in recognising National Sorry Day. We remember the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who were forcibly removed from their families, communities, lands, and cultures. Still today, Indigenous children are 10.6 times more likely than non-Indigenous children to be removed from their families. So, it’s more than just saying …